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An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.

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Swyddfa Annibynnol Ymddygiad yr Heddlu - Recommendation - Essex Police, March 2021

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An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.

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Recommendation - Essex Police, March 2021

The IOPC conducted an independent investigation into an Essex Police Police Community Support Officer’s (PSCO) conduct in relation to a police cadet in 2019, while they were their cadet unit leader. The investigation was also concerned with separate, unrelated matters regarding the PCSO’s actions. This included taking cadets to complete work experience patrols; the use of a work issued mobile phone to contact a member of the public; the removal of the GPS tracking facility from their police radio and their use of Essex Police intelligence systems to look up cadets within their unit. 

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
IOPC reference
2019/128944
Date of recommendation
Friday, 5 March, 2021
Date the force response is due
Friday, 30 April, 2021
Recommendations

The IOPC recommends that Essex Police take steps to ensure that supervising officers and staff in community policing departments are made aware of policies around the use of police cadets in community policing, including considerations around safeguarding, and are updated on any changes.

Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

​This recommendation is accepted in full. Essex Police will begin a programme of awareness to ensure that the policies in place are fully understood by those staff and officers who may have contact with Cadets. It is our intention to further respond in 3 mths time to update you on how this has taken place. 

Voluntary Police Cadet Review

Introduction
The National Voluntary Police Cadets (NVPC) is the National Police Chiefs Council’s (NPCC) framework for police forces to support the delivery a cost effective and rewarding Volunteer Police Cadet programme.
 
The Voluntary Police Cadets (VPC) is a progressive programme, providing many opportunities to listen to the voices of and given meaningful engagement with local young people, which will deliver improved confidence in policing. 
 
The Local Policing Support Unit (LPSU) oversees the management of the VPC within Essex Police.  The VPC Coordinator is the dedicated resource to provide strategic oversight, safeguarding compliance, administration, and co-ordination to support the delivery of the Essex VPC programme across the county.  
 
An Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) investigation (concluded 2021) of an Essex VPC Leader concluded that the individual had committed Gross Misconduct by breaching Professional Standards in relation to inappropriate contact with a female VPC.
 
The IOPC made the following Recommendation:
 
1.      The IOPC recommends that Essex Police take steps to ensure that supervising officers and staff in community policing departments are made aware of policies around the use of police cadets in community policing, including considerations around safeguarding, and are updated on any changes.
 
 
As a result of this investigation Essex Police’s VPC Oversight Board, Chaired by Assistant Chief Constable Rachel Nolan has commissioned a review of the current Safeguarding arrangements around the VPC.
 
Areas for consideration:
 
1.A review of the National and Local Safeguarding Training available to VPC leaders.  
2.A review of Policies and Procedures in relation to the VPC and Safeguarding.  
3.Consider if there is potential learning for the VPC Command to be identified around the following areas:
-          Formal Training provided to leaders
-          Formal review and assessment of leaders
-          Assess the suitability and performance of a leader
-          Governance and Oversight of the VPC
-          Policies and procedures around VPC
 
Background
 
The Voluntary Police Cadets were introduced to Essex Police in June 2015.  There are now 13 units across Southend, Essex and Thurrock.   There are 180 cadets and 67 leaders.  The age range for the cadets is 13-18 years of age.    
 
Essex Police have introduced a new Marshall Portal which allows the VPC Management Team to maintain accurate records of all cadets.   I am still awaiting Selection Process.
 
The current selection process for leaders is as follows:
 
·         Applications for new leaders are received by the VPC Coordinator.
·         VPC Coordinator has an initial conversation with the applicant detailing the role.
·         The applicant will attend the local VPC unit and meet with the Unit leader.
·         The Unit leader will conduct a suitability assessment.
·         Applicants completes vetting and Data Barring System (DBS) form. 
·         Once vetting is cleared, they are issued with Cadet Leader Uniform and allocated a Unit.
·         All new leaders are supported and mentored by an experienced Leader.
 
DBS checks have only recently been made compulsory countrywide, whereas Essex VPC have carried out these checks from its inception.
 
Potential VPC Leaders complete an application form which is submitted to the VPC Coordinator. The selection process is informal.  There isn’t any guidance from NVPC around leader selection and therefore Essex has designed the above process.  Unit leaders are not trained to perform the selection process but rely on their experience as leaders and police personnel to ensure the selection process is fair and transparent. [3]
 
There is not a set probation period for newly appointed VPC leaders. As stated, they are mentored and supported until they feel confident to perform the role independently.
 
Training
 
There is no formal national leader training for the VPC, with the exception of Safeguarding training, therefore Forces such as Essex Police have relied on more experienced leaders to mentor and support new leaders.
 
The NVPC will be introducing ‘train the trainer’ inputs in the Autumn 2021.  This will allow the VPC Coordinator to train all leaders in the following areas:
·         Safeguarding
·         Coaching
·         Mentoring
 
This will enable the Coordinator to provide ‘in house’ training going forward to support all new leaders as well as continued professional development for existing leaders.
 
National VPC also provide mandatory Online Safeguarding training for all VPC leaders.  The learning outcomes for the introduction to safeguarding are:
 
•Explore your role and responsibility as a Leader within VPC
•Discuss what is a safe place, now what to do if it becomes unsafe
•Policy, process, and code of conduct
•State the types of abuse and harm and their key indicators
•Describe VPC principles when responding to disclosures, allegations, and concerns
•Explain the VPC child protection process when responding to allegations, disclosures, or safeguarding concerns.
 
To date 50 leaders out of 67, 74% have completed the training offered by National VPC.   There are courses commencing in May and all outstanding leaders will attend this training.    The VPC coordinator maintains a record of completion and actively directs leaders to complete the training.  New courses have been released by the NVPC and all remaining leaders have been put forward for this training.
Furthermore, there is also a pocket guide to safeguarding[5] and all leaders are required to sign a code of conduct. 
 
NVPC is in the process of producing:
·        Leader training will be rolled out in Autumn 2021 
·         Safer Recruitment Policy for Leaders
·         Valuing Volunteers Framework 
·         Continuous Improvement Framework 
 
Policies/Procedures
 
All VPC Policies and procedures were updated in December 2020 and are National VPC Compliant.  All Leaders have access to all the following VPC Policies and Procedures: 
 
·         C2100 Policy Volunteer Police Cadets
·         C2101 Procedure VPC Recruitment
·         C2102 Procedure VPC Units
·         C2103 Procedure VPC Administration and Communication
·         C2104 Procedure VPC Operations, Events and Court Attendance
·         C2105 Procedure VPC Duke of Edinburgh

Governance/Oversight
 
The VPC Co-ordinator has day to day responsibility of the Cadet Leaders and reports directly to the Citizens in Policing Manager. The CiP Commander reports to the HoD LPSU, CiP and Specials.   ACC Nolan is the Designated Officer for the VPC and chairs the VPC Oversight Board quarterly meetings.
 
Conclusion
 
In 2015 there was very limited guidance or support from National VPC.  Forces were left to create the VPC’s on their own.  It has only been within the last year that NVPC have provided national guidance in an attempt to streamline all forces by providing policy and procedure around safeguarding.  Forces are now starting to experience this support in terms of training and guidance. Having reviewed the Essex VPC based on the terms of reference it is clear there are some gaps in the area of safeguarding and training for VPC leaders.  
 
The following areas have been highlighted:
 
·         National Safeguarding training for leaders is online and 26% remain untrained.
·         No local CPD or training has been identified.
·         The Selection and interview process for leaders is informal and there does not appear to be any assessment around the suitability and/or performance of a leader before they join the unit.
·         No formal review and assessment of a leader’s performance.
·         Safeguarding Policy - There is no evidence leaders are routinely checked around their understanding.
·         VPC Leader Meetings - Meetings are held quarterly but are not widely attended due to the number of leaders and their availability.
 
VPC has expanded greatly over the last couple of years with 180 cadets and 67 leaders in all Districts.   This is a vast team of people for one Coordinator to manage. The VPC Coordinator is the dedicated resource to provide strategic oversight, safeguarding compliance, administration, and co-ordination to support the delivery of the Essex VPC programme across the county.  In reality, the current post holder has been required to prioritise his time around expanding the units across the force, introducing the Duke of Edinburgh Award, organising the VPC Summer Camp and annual parades due to lack of capacity.
 
Over the last 12 months the Coordinator has carried out a review of all the leaders and cadet’s paperwork, ensuring it is up to date and accurate.  This has included ensuring all leaders vetting and DBS is up to date.
 
Interesting to note that our Kent counterparts have five team members dedicated to VPC: 3 Co-ordinators, one per LPA and then two administrative support assistants.   They have similar number of units, cadets, and leaders to Essex.
The Essex VPC Coordinator would benefit from administrative support to afford him the opportunity to concentrate on the important issues raised within this report around safeguarding and training.
 
In response to the IOPC recommendations following their gross misconduct investigation Essex Police are able to provide the following update:
 
1.Essex Police take steps to ensure that supervising officers and staff in community policing departments are made aware of policies around the use of police cadets in community policing, including considerations around safeguarding, and are updated on any changes.
This follows an IOPC investigation during which it became apparent that police cadets were going on general patrol in vehicles and on foot one-to-one with PCSOs from the community policing department in Southend. 
 
The VPC Coordinator will:
·         Provide guidance to CPT Supervisors and Staff around the deployment of the VPC
·         VPC Leaders will be reminded of the policy and procedure
·         VPC will be informed of the policy and procedure

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